Apple iPhone 11 review: The best $700 iPhone Apple has ever made

When you first hear the names of Apple’s new iPhones — the iPhone 11, iPhone 11 Pro and iPhone 11 Pro Max — you may have some questions. Where’s the iPhone X ($900 at Boost Mobile)? And what makes the iPhone Pro… Pro? What happened to last year’s XS and XS Max ($1,000 at Best Buy)? This year’s new phones are polished sequels (literally and figuratively) to the three we got last year. For some people the iPhone 11 just needs to be better than the XS. And it indeed is. But for others, it’s nice to know where Apple stands in the larger landscape of phones. There are wild 5G speeds on the horizon, plus bizarre and expensive foldable phones like Samsung’s Galaxy Fold. And then there’s the more expensive $799 (£669, AU$1,049) Google Pixel 4, which actually makes the $699 (£729, AU$1,199) iPhone 11 look like an even better value.

Apple did a great job with new features, including some serious camera improvements like Night Mode for taking photos in dimly lit situations and Deep Fusion, a new way for the iPhone 11 and 11 Pro to process

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Dell XPS 13 review: Tiny tweaks to a long-time favorite

Having watched the Dell XPS 13 evolve over the past several years, I really thought we had reached the end of the line in terms of possible improvements. The 2019 version had a super-slim bezel, good performance at a decent price, 4K screen options, and was more of a major step forward, solving a long-time engineering problem by putting a super-tiny webcam up on top of the screen, instead of underneath it. 

Like

  • Ever so slightly larger screen.
  • Ever so slightly smaller body.
  • More ports and connections than typical.

Don’t Like

  • Trading up to a mainstream CPU costs more.
  • I’ve never loved the woven texture palm rest.

And while I could no longer make jokes about the infamous up-the-nose webcam shot, I pretty much didn’t have any major design complaints about the system anymore. So, where do you go from there? 

You start by tweaking the screen, shaving down that bezel a tiny bit more and shaping the lid, so you can fit a 13.4-inch display in there, instead of a 13.3-inch one. That sounds like a pretty tiny tweak, and it is, but I like that it now has a very modern-feeling 16:10 aspect ratio screen. Not quite

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Lenovo Yoga C940 (14-inch) review: A little extra screen and a lot to like

If you’ve ever reached for your phone instead of your laptop simply because it’s faster to wake up, unlock and start working, you’ll appreciate what Lenovo’s Yoga C940 can do. The company’s flagship 14-inch two-in-one is an Intel Project Athena device, a select group of laptops co-engineered with Intel to perform more like your phone. While I never felt like its predecessor, the C930, was slow, it’s surprising how responsive the C940 feels by comparison.

Like

  • Overall faster processor and graphics performance
  • Improved display quality
  • Excellent feature set for its price

Don’t Like

  • Included pen is a little small for extended use
  • All ports are on one side

Lift the lid and it instantly wakes from sleep. The fingerprint reader unlocks the C940 in a second and since the Wi-Fi connects just as fast, it’s essentially ready to work immediately. With the laptop asleep and lid open, you only have to put your fingertip down on the reader and it’s awake and unlocked as fast as your phone. 

Lenovo Yoga C940

Lenovo Yoga C940-14IIL (FHD display) Lenovo Yoga C940-14IIL (UHD display)
Price as reviewed $1,300 $1,600
Display size/resolution 14-inch 1,920×1,080 touch display 14-inch 3,840×2,160 touch display
CPU 1.3GHz
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UE Hyperboom review: A jumbo portable Bluetooth speaker that rocks

The UE Hyperboom is one tall pitcher of Bluetooth speaker.


David Carnoy/CNET

Ultimate Ears Boom speakers come in a few different sizes, but none as big as the Hyberboom. A supersize wireless speaker that tips the scales at a hefty 13 pounds, the Hyperboom makes the Megaboom 3 look unquestionably puny. Available in black only at launch, the Hyperboom costs $399 (399 euros, AU$599). That’s not cheap, but it sounds better than a lot of the jumbo portable speakers on the market right now. (There’s no word yet on UK pricing or when it will be released in the UK, but it’ll likely match the euro price.)

Like

  • Big sound with strong bass and good detail
  • Up to 24 hours of battery life at moderate volume levels
  • IP4 water-resistance rating (splashproof)
  • Good wireless Bluetooth range (up to 150 feet)
  • Can wirelessly link with other UE Boom and Megaboom speakers
  • Integrated microphone automatically reads the environment and calibrates the sound to fill any space, indoors or outdoors

Don’t Like

  • Expensive
  • No Wi-Fi or voice assistant built-in
  • At 13 pounds, it’s not a speaker you want to carry too far

Ultimate Ears reps told me the Hyperboom was created after the

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Razer Blade Studio Edition review: A pricey MacBook Pro alternative for graphics pros


Lori Grunin/CNET

You’re probably not in the mood to think about a $4,000 (£4,000 or about AU$7,900) laptop right now, but if you’re attempting to edit video, work with 3D models or perform other pro-level graphics tasks at home, now’s the time to start considering one. And if you’re going to go for it, Razer‘s sleek Blade 15 Studio Edition ($4,000 at Best Buy) delivers a nicely balanced combination of design, speed and features for folks who need workstation-class graphics and Windows. It’ll serve you well when you can finally head back to the office, too. 

Like

  • Slim, attractive design
  • Easy-on-the-eyes OLED screen

Don’t Like

  • Expensive
  • OLED is suboptimal for some professional uses

If you’re only editing photos, however, this may not be right for you. Why not? Because its expensive Nvidia Quadro RTX 5000 graphics card, which differentiates it from a Razer Blade 15 Advanced ($2,600 at Best Buy), may not be worth paying for. A lot of photo work demands more processing power, and you might be better off opting for a system with a more high-powered processor instead. 

Because of the design, the Razer Blades inevitably get compared to Apple MacBook

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2020 Land Rover Defender first drive review: The real deal

I never really understood the charm of the Land Rover Defender until I drove a 2007 model to a fifth-place finish in the Rallye Aïcha des Gazelles in Morocco. When it worked, which was 95% of the time, it was unstoppable, its grunty diesel engine allowing me to keep pace in the dunes and its solid axles making short work of rocky hill climbs.

As Land Rover embarks on one of its most important relaunches, I’m happy to report that the new Defender is just as capable as that old one. On a three-day journey through the wilds of Namibia, the Defender 110 conquers it all: rocks, river beds, mud, water and soft sand. I’m sure it’s good on pavement, too, but I’ll have to wait to test it at home before making a final call.

Loaded up and ready to go.


Emme Hall/Roadshow

My first encounter with the new Defender is in the small town of Opuwo in northern Namibia. All of the test cars on this trip have the optional Explorer Pack with a roof rack, side-mounted gear carrier and a spare tire cover. My car also has a deployable roof ladder and sleek snorkel integrated into the

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