Coronavirus medicine: Vaccines, chloroquine and drugs to treat COVID-19

Everything you need to know about COVID-19 vaccines.


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For the most up-to-date news and information about the coronavirus pandemic, visit the WHO website.

COVID-19, the potentially fatal respiratory illness first detected in December 2019, has spread across the globe with unseen speed and ferocity. It’s forced the cancellation of major events, postponed sports seasons, and sent the world into self-isolation in an attempt to curb the spread. Health authorities and governments are attempting to flatten the curve and mitigate extensive transmission in the community, while biotech firms and researchers turn their attention to the coronavirus causing the disease: SARS-CoV-2.

Since it was first discovered as the causative agent of the new disease, scientists have been racing to get a better understanding of the virus’ genetic makeup, how it infects cells and how to effectively treat it. There’s no cure, and medical specialists can only treat the symptoms of the disease. Many different treatment options have been proposed and some older drugs seem to be associated with positive outcomes — but much more work is required. However, the long-term strategy to combat COVID-19, which has spread to every continent on Earth besides Antarctica, is to develop a vaccine.

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Apple iPhone 11 review: The best $700 iPhone Apple has ever made

When you first hear the names of Apple’s new iPhones — the iPhone 11, iPhone 11 Pro and iPhone 11 Pro Max — you may have some questions. Where’s the iPhone X ($900 at Boost Mobile)? And what makes the iPhone Pro… Pro? What happened to last year’s XS and XS Max ($1,000 at Best Buy)? This year’s new phones are polished sequels (literally and figuratively) to the three we got last year. For some people the iPhone 11 just needs to be better than the XS. And it indeed is. But for others, it’s nice to know where Apple stands in the larger landscape of phones. There are wild 5G speeds on the horizon, plus bizarre and expensive foldable phones like Samsung’s Galaxy Fold. And then there’s the more expensive $799 (£669, AU$1,049) Google Pixel 4, which actually makes the $699 (£729, AU$1,199) iPhone 11 look like an even better value.

Apple did a great job with new features, including some serious camera improvements like Night Mode for taking photos in dimly lit situations and Deep Fusion, a new way for the iPhone 11 and 11 Pro to process

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Homemade masks, home testing, PPE and every other coronavirus term to know

Global confirmed COVID-19 cases as of March 26, 2020 (cumulative). Tracked by Johns Hopkins Center for Systems Science and Engineering.


Johns Hopkins Center for Systems Science and Engineering/Screenshot by CNET
For the most up-to-date news and information about the coronavirus pandemic, visit the WHO website.

The coronavirus pandemic is putting words in the mouths of billions of people worldwide. Shelter in place, COVID-19, homemade masks, PPE, home testing kits. These terms now form a lexicon that has become part of daily conversation as the virus, which has now killed more than 29,000 people around the globe, continues to spread.

It’s an unsettling time. Educating yourself on the science and the social responses to the COVID-19 outbreak will help you understand the situation and help explain it to others.

If you know all of these key terms, congratulations on being so thoroughly informed. If not, we’ll help you brush up on the critical terms to get along in a coronavirus world. We’ll continue to update this story as our social response to the virus evolves. 

http://www.cnet.com/


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Novel coronavirus and SARS-CoV-2

No, the virus

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Dell XPS 13 review: Tiny tweaks to a long-time favorite

Having watched the Dell XPS 13 evolve over the past several years, I really thought we had reached the end of the line in terms of possible improvements. The 2019 version had a super-slim bezel, good performance at a decent price, 4K screen options, and was more of a major step forward, solving a long-time engineering problem by putting a super-tiny webcam up on top of the screen, instead of underneath it. 

Like

  • Ever so slightly larger screen.
  • Ever so slightly smaller body.
  • More ports and connections than typical.

Don’t Like

  • Trading up to a mainstream CPU costs more.
  • I’ve never loved the woven texture palm rest.

And while I could no longer make jokes about the infamous up-the-nose webcam shot, I pretty much didn’t have any major design complaints about the system anymore. So, where do you go from there? 

You start by tweaking the screen, shaving down that bezel a tiny bit more and shaping the lid, so you can fit a 13.4-inch display in there, instead of a 13.3-inch one. That sounds like a pretty tiny tweak, and it is, but I like that it now has a very modern-feeling 16:10 aspect ratio screen. Not quite

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The best meditation app to help you destress


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Meditation apps have become one of the easiest and most accessible ways to maintain a mindfulness regimen. Whether you prefer guided meditation, deep breathing exercises or calming sleep stories, mindfulness meditation can be a huge added benefit to your daily wellness
regimen.

Research suggests that the benefits of meditation can include a reduction in stress levels, depression, anxiety and insomnia. And don’t forget the physical benefits: Meditation and deep breathing can also reduce blood pressure and improve your heart rate variability, a metric that can tell you how well you handle stress. In addition, many studies show sleep meditation can calm your mind and help you get a more quality night’s sleep.

Read more: Coronavirus anxiety and fears: 5 tips from a psychotherapist on how to cope


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For many people, finding the time or energy to commit to a regular practice is difficult, and though in-person visits to a meditation studio for meditation programs are a great option for some, for others they may not be a practical approach to consistent meditation. With a little help from good meditation apps, zen could

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Apple partners with CDC to release new COVID-19 screening tool and app for coronavirus

The new screening tools are available online and in the App Store and provide a questionnaire to see if coronavirus symptoms warrant treatment and testing.

Big tech continues to help fight the coronavirus pandemic. On Friday, Apple released a new website and iOS app to allow for COVID-19 screening for coronavirus symptoms. 

The COVID-19 app and website were built in partnership with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), as well as the White House’s Coronavirus Task Force and the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA). 

Coronavirus symptoms assessed via Apple app

The app and website both have up-to-date information on the coronavirus and tells people what to do if they’re experiencing symptoms such as sneezing, coughing, a fever or difficulty breathing. It also includes less well-known symptoms such as a sore throat, chills, body aches, vomiting and diarrhea.

SEE: Coronavirus: Critical IT policies and tools every business needs (TechRepublic Premium)   

The tools take the user through several pages of questions based on risk factors, recent exposure and symptoms for either themself or someone else. They are then directed to call their medical provider or 911 if there is a concern that they may have COVID-19 based on their responses.

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