Security experts level criticism at Apple after Big Sur launch issues

Users took to social media to complain about slow systems with one report pointing to an OCSP responder as the culprit.

Apple announced at its November 2020 event that macOS 11 Big Sur would arrive Nov. 12. 

Image: Apple

Apple was forced to issue a statement Monday on its data collection policies after the release last week of Big Sur led to complaints of slow systems, which morphed into a larger debate about privacy on Macs and iPhones. The release stated the process is part of its efforts to protect users from malware.

Apple released macOS Big Sur on Nov. 12 and hours later, hundreds of people took to social media to complain about problems they were having with certain applications on their Macs. Security expert Phil Vachon explained what happened on his blog Security Embedded, writing that an Online Certificate Status Protocol (OCSP) responder checking certificates of each and every application was to blame after an Apple server went down. 

Vachon said that in an effort to protect users and customers from malware, Apple uses an OCSP responder so that “at every launch of an app, macOS would dutifully check if the certificate used by the signer

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Second stimulus check: How fast the IRS could send it this time

The IRS sent the first stimulus check to different groups first.


Angela Lang/CNET

One issue that President Donald Trump and President-elect Joe Biden seem to be publicly in accord about is that lawmakers should resume negotiations to pass another COVID-19 economic rescue package with more stimulus aid.

“Congress must now do a Covid Relief Bill,” Trump tweeted Saturday. “Get it done!”

Biden also called for immediate action: “Now,” he said on Monday. “Not tomorrow. Now.”

A bipartisan agreement must be found soon in order to pass a stimulus package before the end of the year. If Congress fails to pass more aid during the lame-duck session, Biden has a stimulus plan that could enter the conversation more seriously after his inauguration on Jan. 20

Once legislators do pass more aid, the IRS has the opportunity to act faster than it did in the spring when it sent out the first wave of stimulus payments. The systems are already in place to sign up for direct deposit, track your payment and send out paper checks and EIP debit cards to people who aren’t getting a bank transfer. However, there may be a complication if the stimulus bill

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