Asus ProArt StudioBook One review: For every pro, there’s a con

Asus, the company that brought you the hinge with a lift, stands that idea on its head — or really its lid — for the ProArt StudioBook One. It’s a high-ranking member of Asus’ creator-focused laptop line, designed for professionals who need workstation graphics. The StudioBook One opens a gap behind the screen when you lift the lid, increasing the amount of cool air the fans can suck in from the bottom and sides without requiring big, unsightly vents.

Like

  • Terrific 120Hz 4K display for working in Adobe RGB
  • Fast workstation graphics for its size
  • Three Thunderbolt 3 connectors plus bundled hub

Don’t Like

  • Keyboard has little travel and prone to repeated characters
  • Heavy for a 15-incher
  • Has some design annoyances, like the location of the hot-air ventilation and ports
  • Lacks the breadth of color management tools we expect for the money

After I finished hyperventilating because I thought I’d broken the $10,000 system, I found the design pretty clever. The notebook’s components sit behind the display rather than underneath the keyboard, much like in an all-in-one desktop such as the iMac. Sadly, I won’t have it long enough to figure out if it will have problems with

Read More View More Asus ProArt StudioBook One review: For every pro, there’s a con

Stimulus check eligibility: How the requirements could change with a new relief bill

The final proposal for who may or may not qualify for a second stimulus check is coming into focus.


Sarah Tew/CNET

President Donald Trump intended his executive action over the weekend to offer some of the financial support the next stimulus bill would have provided. But when negotiations stalled, his team drafted up executive orders that focused on a few key areas, leaving plenty for room for a larger financial rescue package from Congress — including a second stimulus check for as much as $1,200 — if the two sides restart talks.

“We’ve agreed on more direct payments, like we sent last time,” Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin said Monday. The HEALS Act advanced by the Republican-led Senate 

Here’s how each side’s proposal for the next stimulus bill compares. Keep reading to see if you might fall into the eligibility requirements that are likely to be imposed in a final bill (again, if there is one). This story updates frequently.

Who would get a stimulus check if the HEALS Act is passed?

There may be continued discussions over stimulus relief in the coming week. If the HEALS Act becomes law, it would largely

Read More View More Stimulus check eligibility: How the requirements could change with a new relief bill

2021 Porsche 911 Targa first drive review: Sun king

Convertibles aren’t the only way to let the good light in. The Porsche 911 Targa and its half-removable roof has always stood as a unique outlier, sharing its standout quality with very few cars on the road. For the 2021 model year, the 911 Targa finally catches up to the rest of the 992-generation lineup, and it’s a good’un.

The most prominent part of the 2021 Porsche 911 Targa is the roof bar just behind the first row. This, and the large expanse of glass behind it, are capable of doing a surprisingly complex dance. It’s all great theater, too. Everything behind the Targa bar lifts up, the actual roof slides its way to its home behind the rear seats, and everything slowly locks back into place. And you know the best part? Whether it’s static or dynamic, the roof looks badass.

It’s worth noting that the Targa’s roof doesn’t operate at any speed above a standstill. In most situations, this isn’t a problem, but if you’re a bad planner like me, staring down ever-darkening clouds one stop light before a highway on-ramp, those 19 seconds feel like 100. Nevertheless, the ballet is smooth and delightfully free of creaks,

Read More View More 2021 Porsche 911 Targa first drive review: Sun king

Microsoft cutting support for Office 2010 and Office 2016 for Mac

Microsoft will no longer provide technical support, bug fixes, or security updates for Office 2010 and Office 2016 for Mac after Oct. 13, 2020.

Image: Artur, Getty Images/iStockPhoto

In a reissued statement, Microsoft has reiterated its intention to end support for both Office 2010 for the PC and Office 2016 for the Mac as of Oct. 13, 2020. While both productivity suites will continue to operate after that date, Microsoft will no longer provide technical support, bug fixes, or security updates for those applications.

Businesses and organizations, especially those subject to privacy compliance regulations, should immediately take steps to update or migrate to a more current version of productivity suite. The risk to personal users is not as acute as it is to businesses, but it is still serious and should be addressed as soon as possible.

SEE: TechRepublic Premium editorial calendar: IT policies, checklists, toolkits, and research for download (TechRepublic Premium) 

Continuing to operate using non-supported versions of Microsoft Office would be reckless and irresponsible, particularly with viable and relatively inexpensive alternatives available.

No support for Office 2010 and Office 2016 for Mac

After Oct. 13, 2020, Microsoft will no longer support Office 2010 and Office 2016 for Mac.

Read More View More Microsoft cutting support for Office 2010 and Office 2016 for Mac