Tribit StormBox Micro speaker review: A pocket-size Bluetooth speaker with surprisingly big sound

Over the years Tribit has made some of the better budget portable Bluetooth headphones and speakers, starting with its XFree Tune and XSound Go, respectively. The latter speaker is still around and delivers surprisingly good sound for less than $30. The larger MaxSound Plus ($60) gives you more bass and volume and the StormBox ($52) is Tribit’s more affordable take on such popular speakers as the UE Boom and JBL Flip 5. Now it’s doing a budget version of Bose’s excellent SoundLink Micro speaker. The new model is called the StormBox Micro and it’s one of the best-sounding pocket-size speakers I’ve heard.   

Like

  • Very compact (pocket-friendly)
  • More bass and volume than most speakers this small
  • Waterproof and dustproof (IP67)
  • Integrated strap
  • Can be linked to another StormBox Micro for stereo mode
  • USB-C charging
  • 8 hours of battery life

Don’t Like

  • Not as durable as Bose SoundLink Micro
  • Distorts slightly at higher volumes with certain tracks

Read more: Best Bluetooth speakers of 2020

Measuring 3.87 by 3.87 by 1.37 inches (7.3 by 7.3 by 3.5 cm) and weighing 9.9 ounces (280 grams), the StormBox Micro has a slightly larger footprint than the Bose, which weighs 10.2 ounces (290

Read More View More Tribit StormBox Micro speaker review: A pocket-size Bluetooth speaker with surprisingly big sound

Apple to reopen 100 more US stores this week

Many of the stores are offering curbside or storefront service only, while several will allow customers inside, albeit with face masks on and social distancing rules in effect.

Apple is reopening more than 100 additional stores in the US this week following temporary closures in response to coronavirus quarantining. The store re-openings will occur across 21 states from Arizona to Wisconsin, with a little less than half fully accessible to customers and the rest providing curbside or storefront service only.

SEE: Life after lockdown: Your office job will never be the same–here’s what to expect (cover story PDF) (TechRepublic)

“This week we’ll return to serving customers in many US locations,” Apple said in a statement released on Tuesday. “For customer safety and convenience, most stores will offer curbside or storefront service only, where we provide online order pick-up and Genius Bar appointments.”

The new re-openings include six stores in Arizona, 29 in California, 11 in Florida, six in Georgia, one in Indiana, one in Kansas, two in Kentucky, five in Michigan, three in Missouri, three in Nevada, one in New Mexico, one in New York, seven in Ohio, one in Oregon, one in Pennsylvania, one in South Carolina, one

Read More View More Apple to reopen 100 more US stores this week

9 reasons why your stimulus check isn’t here: Dead ends, form issues, more

The IRS has been sending stimulus checks for over a month. Where’s yours? 


Angela Lang/CNET
For the most up-to-date news and information about the coronavirus pandemic, visit the WHO website.

If you’re not among the tens of millions of Americans who’ve already received their coronavirus stimulus payments, you’re probably asking what’s causing a delay with your check. After all, the federal government authorized the money as part of a package intended to help offset the pandemic’s worsening economic effects and you’d like to spend it. We’ve found some possible barriers that may be holding up your payment with the IRS. 

If and when your 2020 relief check does come from the IRS, it’ll arrive either through direct deposit to your bank account (if you set that up before the May 13 deadline) or in the mail (you’ll get a paper check or a mailed prepaid debit card). It’ll be your money to spend, free and clear. The IRS said it’ll step up its payment schedule through the end of June and has already sent more than 150 million checks so far. In addition, a bill for a second round of stimulus checks for up

Read More View More 9 reasons why your stimulus check isn’t here: Dead ends, form issues, more