Razer Blade Studio Edition review: A pricey MacBook Pro alternative for graphics pros


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You’re probably not in the mood to think about a $4,000 (£4,000 or about AU$7,900) laptop right now, but if you’re attempting to edit video, work with 3D models or perform other pro-level graphics tasks at home, now’s the time to start considering one. And if you’re going to go for it, Razer‘s sleek Blade 15 Studio Edition ($4,000 at Best Buy) delivers a nicely balanced combination of design, speed and features for folks who need workstation-class graphics and Windows. It’ll serve you well when you can finally head back to the office, too. 

Like

  • Slim, attractive design
  • Easy-on-the-eyes OLED screen

Don’t Like

  • Expensive
  • OLED is suboptimal for some professional uses

If you’re only editing photos, however, this may not be right for you. Why not? Because its expensive Nvidia Quadro RTX 5000 graphics card, which differentiates it from a Razer Blade 15 Advanced ($2,600 at Best Buy), may not be worth paying for. A lot of photo work demands more processing power, and you might be better off opting for a system with a more high-powered processor instead. 

Because of the design, the Razer Blades inevitably get compared to Apple MacBook

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Coronavirus medicine: The vaccines and drugs in development to treat COVID-19

Everything you need to know about COVID-19 vaccines.


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For the most up-to-date news and information about the coronavirus pandemic, visit the WHO website.

COVID-19, the potentially fatal respiratory illness first detected in December 2019, has spread across the globe, forcing the cancellation of major events, postponing sports seasons, and sending many into self-imposed quarantine and self-isolation. Health authorities and governments are attempting to flatten the curve, mitigating the spread through the community, while scientists and biotech firms turn their attention to the coronavirus causing the disease: SARS-CoV-2.

Since it was first discovered as the causative agent of the new disease, scientists have been racing to get a better understanding of the virus’ genetic makeup, how it infects cells and how to effectively treat it. There’s no cure, and medical specialists can only treat the symptoms of the disease. Many different treatment options have been proposed and some older drugs seem to be associated with positive outcomes — but much more work is required. However, the long-term strategy to combat COVID-19, which has spread to every continent on Earth besides Antarctica, is to develop a vaccine.

Developing new vaccines takes time, and they must be rigorously tested

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2020 Land Rover Defender first drive review: The real deal

I never really understood the charm of the Land Rover Defender until I drove a 2007 model to a fifth-place finish in the Rallye Aïcha des Gazelles in Morocco. When it worked, which was 95% of the time, it was unstoppable, its grunty diesel engine allowing me to keep pace in the dunes and its solid axles making short work of rocky hill climbs.

As Land Rover embarks on one of its most important relaunches, I’m happy to report that the new Defender is just as capable as that old one. On a three-day journey through the wilds of Namibia, the Defender 110 conquers it all: rocks, river beds, mud, water and soft sand. I’m sure it’s good on pavement, too, but I’ll have to wait to test it at home before making a final call.

Loaded up and ready to go.


Emme Hall/Roadshow

My first encounter with the new Defender is in the small town of Opuwo in northern Namibia. All of the test cars on this trip have the optional Explorer Pack with a roof rack, side-mounted gear carrier and a spare tire cover. My car also has a deployable roof ladder and sleek snorkel integrated into the

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